Frequently Asked Questions

The history and the convenience of the Scooter dates back to the mid 1940’s and originated from Europe as an economical form of transport during the Second World War.

Nealy all vintage scooters are 2 stroke, manually operated (clutch and gears) and is a format that the world famous Vespa PX range utilized up until recent years.

Today modern Scooters are usually fully automatic, which means you can turn on the ignition and go: no clutch pedal and no gear changes.

A scooter differs from a motorcycle in several important ways. Scooters generally have less power and acceleration than their two-wheeled cousins, although there are some very grunty machines on the market.

A scooter also has a "platform" based design. While a motorcycle rider sits astride the machine, with the thighs gripping either side of the fuel tank and feet on pedals, a scooter rider sits more upright with their feet on a footboard or platform.

To get a motor scooter licence in NSW you need to go through the same process as a motorcycle riders.

Pass the pre-learner course (practical).

Pass the rider knowledge test (computer) - and progress to a learner rider licence.

Take the six-hour pre-provisional course.

Pass the Motorcycle operator Skills Test (practical) - and progress to the provisional rider licence.

Hold your provisional licence for 36 months - then you can go to a registry or service centre and upgrade to a full licence. There isn't a test at this final stage

There's one minor exception to this process. You can get a license that restricts you to a 160cc or less automatic motor scooter. To get this license you still need to complete all the tests but can skip the pre-provisional course, however most people choose to take the course so they can progress to a full rider license.

I have never ridden a motorcycle before. Will I be able to complete the Learner’s course?

The course is based around zero motorcycle experience. All you need is a good sense of balance and coordination. If you can ride a bicycle, that is a great start. However, the course is competency based, and we cannot guarantee you will pass. There is limited free remedial training available if you do not pass the course

To book your Pre-learners course. https://www.stayupright.com.au/event-template-nsw/?eventtemplate=135-NSW-RMS-Pre-Learner-Course-(2-half-days)

There is a huge variety of scooters available in Australia. Riders should look for something which comes from a reputable brand, be backed with a strong warranty and have good dealer and importer back up for spare parts and service. They should also consider the purpose of and types of roads and conditions that you will be riding on.

The scooter industry explains that the growth of scooters into Australian culture is driven by value and cost of living but also includes style.

Hollie Black, Chair of the Australian Scooter Federation and General Manager of Select Scootas, says that riding a scooter is one of the most economical ways to get around, “for a couple of gold coins, you can fill your tank and commute for days!”

 

Apart from offering great value-for-money transport, scooters positives are convenience in negotiating city congestion, a more environmentally friendly footprint and ease in finding a car park. It’s the choice of transport all over the world and when the most congested cities in the world make it work, you know you’re onto a good thing!

Scooter riders, like all motorcyclists, are vulnerable on the road. If you get into trouble, there's not much between you and the bitumen.

Forget any ideas of buzzing around dressed in a T-shirt and shorts. Unless you want to risk some ugly injuries, you need to take the style pressure down and wear boots, gloves, a full faced Australian Standards approved helmet (look for the AS1698 sticker) and sturdy, long-sleeved pants and jacket.

Scooters are not necessarily more stable than motorbikes. They have small wheels, which makes them vulnerable to changes in the road surface including water, oil, loose gravel and holes.

Like motorcycles, scooters are difficult for other drivers to see. So you've got to be extra careful, especially at intersections, and position yourself on the road so you're visible to other drivers.

 

Road safety publications and guides can be ordered online.

Yes. There are tons of aftermarket parts available. From lightened variator kits, stronger clutches, performance exhausts,  ECUS, and Cylinder and Piston kits. Scooter Meccanica  has many years of experience in installing these kits, we can recommend which will provide the most reliable and best quality for your budget.

My scooter does not start? Check the battery. Make sure that there is petrol.

 Make sure the kill switch is not activated, at either the handle bar or kick stand.

If your scooter is fitted with an immobiliser, try the master key.

If you don’t have access to a van or trailer, then we recommend you call a reputable scooter transport company. Scooter Meccanica recommends Jim’s Motorcycle Transports 0417 499 612   , or Braden At Motorcycle and Scooter Transport 0412 343 911

Check the  tyre pressure. A flat tyre will slow down you scooter considerable and be dangerous to ride.

If you have a scooter fitter with ABS then the scooter’s ECU will not enable you to accelerate past 40km/hr.

If you have lost all your keys, and you own a scooter with an immobiliser, then the ECU and key set all have to be changed.

The key barrels will have to be drilled out ( if it is steering lock position) and replaced.

Is it expensive process, and strongly recommend that you keep your master key safe and in a place that you can recall where you have left it.

 

If you have lost all your keys, and you own a scooter with an immobiliser, then the ECU and key set all have to be changed.

The key barrels will have to be drilled out ( if it is steering lock position) and replaced.

Is it expensive process, and strongly recommend that you keep your master key safe and in a place that you can recall where you have left it.

 

VINTAGE SCOOTERS

The history and the convenience of the Scooter dates back to the mid 1940’s and originated from Europe as an economical form of transport during the Second World War.

Nealy all vintage scooters are 2 stroke, manually operated (clutch and gears) and is a format that the world famous Vespa PX range utilized up until recent years.

Today modern Scooters are usually fully automatic, which means you can turn on the ignition and go: no clutch pedal and no gear changes.

As nearly all vintage Vespa’s and Lambretta’s, with the exception of a few models, are geared with a clutch, as such, a  motorcycle license will be required to ride a classic scooter  in NSW.

All two stroke scooters require 2 stroke oil to be mixed ( wither manually or automatically, if it has a auto lube system).

Please avoid any oil that has a picture of a lawnmower on the label. Your scooter is precision machine, not a landscaping device. Scooter Meccanica recommends Motul.

Most vintage Vespa models use a 2 % mix, except those that do not have needle roller bearing. The user manual for Lambretta is 4%, but from our experience, 3% is sufficient.

Yes, if your scooter is older than 30 years and you are a member of a Transport recognized historic vehicle club can register your classic scooter on historic registration.

https://www.rms.nsw.gov.au/roads/vehicle-registration/how-to-register-a-vehicle/historic-vehicles/registering.html

However any modifications have or  period accessories and options relative to a vehicles age or build date are considered to be within 2-3 years (‘defined period’) of the build date of the vehicle.

The installation of an item must not affect compliance with applicable vehicle standards and scooters built to comply with Australian Design Rules (ADR) 4 and 5 must continue to comply.

 

Scooters from Vietnam and Bali are to be avoided at all costs.

Scooter Meccanica has witnessed a Vietnamese ‘restored’ Lambretta brake in two. Luckily the Lambretta was on the center stand and the owner was not riding it.

There is plenty of information concerning the dangers of riding, let alone trying to maintain a Bali or Viet bodge Vespa or Lambretta. Type in Bali or Vietnam bodge into google for more information and the horror stories.

No

If the scooter has been well built and maintained, they can be bullet proof.

But like all mechanical objects they are prone to inbuilt obsolescence. Sayinf that, Scooter Meccanica only source the highest  quality original and exceptional aftermarket parts. In the last few years, Scooter Meccanica, under the team name of Team GS, have competed  in the Australian Scooter Mille. It is  grueling 500 km a day ride, for two days on Vintage 1960’s GS’s.

In fact when the event was held in Bunbury W.A., ‘Team GS’  not only won  the event, but  took 2nd place and won Best and Fairest!

http://scootermille.weebly.com/the-rules.html

Sandy the owner of Scooter Meccanica,  has meticulously tuned  and engineered his 1974 Vespa Sprint Veloce over the last 27years. The 172cc engine does a 13.7 quarter mile, with the aid of a shot nitrous.

But if you are after something more tame, Sandy will be able to build you the scooter engine of your dreams.

Australia wide clubs include the Lambretta Club of Australia, which is for all vintage Lambretta’s. And the Vespa club of Australia which caters for all Vespa owner, modern and vintage. There are many local clubs, that accept many different makes, such as the Sydney City Scooter Club, Vesparados, the Vespa Club of Sydney and  the Lionhearts, to name a few.

The location of the VIN or frame number on a Vintage Vespa varies according to the type of model it is.

Lambretta frame numbers on all Li/TV/SX machines is found on the kickstart side of the frame tube, just above the motor. The motor number on all Li/TV/SX machines is found on the top of the motor, on the kickstart side just below the clutch arm. Note that the engine numbers normally do not match the frame number.

 

 

The Indian Vespa had a 3 speed engine, round back monocoque chassis, 8" solid wheels and had no battery. They had an oval speedo but from 1966 these were changed to a round speedo. Over 150,000 genuine vespa badged and licenced scooters were built by the Bajaj factory. Their chassis and engine number started with V252, V402 or V462.

For owners of Bajaj Vespas, please visit Indian Scooters Owners Club

http://www.indianscooterownersclub.com/cgi-bin/vespa_chassis_dating.pl

 

For owners of  Italian Vespas, Douglas Vespas – UK, ACMA Vespas – France,

 

Allstate Vespas – USA, Spanish Vespas and Indonesian built Vespas, please visit Scooterhelp.com

https://www.scooterhelp.com/serial/ves.frame.serial.numbers.html